News and Events

New Work at Pompeii: a celebration of the Australian contribution

September 17, 2003

Due to popular demand, an exhibition celebrating the Australian contribution to the study of Pompeii – the world’s oldest archaeological site – has been extended to 25 September.

New Work at Pompeii: a celebration of the Australian contribution features photos of the archaeological site and current excavations, together with historical information, scientific analysis of pottery and rocks, and actual Pompeii artifacts such as fragments of frescoes.

Curator of the exhibition and Manager of the Museum of Ancient Cultures, Karl Van Dyke, says the event came about due to a happy convergence of separate projects.

“First of all, one of our PhD students, Jaye Pont, has been excavating at Pompeii for a number of years. It was a great opportunity to highlight not only her work, but also the collaborative work she’s done with Dr Patrick Conaghan, from the Centre for Ecostratigraphy and Palaeobiology in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences.

The exhibition also highlighted the purchase by the Friends of the Library of the magnificent German monograph series Houses in Pompeii, each volume of which concentrates on a particular house in Pompeii recording in minute detail what remains today and what had been recorded of that house in the past.

Whilst the official exhibition will close at the end of the month, the material from New Work at Pompeii will live on as an important learning resource for NSW and ACT high school children.

Pompeii is already a popular part of the Year 11 HSC Ancient History syllabus, and has recently been named a Core Study area for Year 12 students by the NSW Board of Studies, placing the Museum and the University as a key future provider of resources for students and teachers.

New Work at Pompeii: a celebration of the Australian contribution is on display in the exhibition area of the Macquarie University Library.