POMPEIAN INSCRIPTIONS





CIL IV. 807 (on the wall of a taverna):

HOSPITIVM. HIC LOCATUR TRICLINIVM CVM TRIBVS LECTIS ET COMM(odis)

Guest House. Dining room to let, with three couches and furnishings.


CIL IV. 1679

(graffito): wine (per sextarius) at 1, 2, 4, asses
which = 12, 24 and 48 HS per amphora.

(Columella's stated cost for an amphora of wine is 15 HS per amphora).


CIL IV. 1883:

NEMO EST BELLVS NISI QVI AMAVIT MVLIEREM ADVLES

Nobody is `smart' until he has loved a young girl.


CIL IV. 1454

HIC HABITAT FELICITAS.

Here dwells happiness. [Her name? (as in Petronius) or an indication of the result of a professional meeting with her?? Viewing the original suggests the latter.]


CIL IV. 7038:

CIL IV. 4764:

STERCORARI. AD MVRVM PROGREDERE

PERARI, FVR ES.

You shit. Up against the wall.
Perarius, you're a thief!


CIL IV. 1864

SAMIVS CORNELIO: SVSPENDERE.

Samius says to Cornelius: Go hang!


CIL IV.

EVASI, EFFVGI, SPES ET FORTVNA, VALE!

I have escaped. I have fled. Hope and fortune, farewell!


Inscriptiones Latinae Selectae # 7663:

LATVRNIA IANVARIA, CALCARIA, VIX AN XXXXV.

Laturnia Januaria, lime burner, lived 45 years.


ILS # 6367:

MAMIAE, P F SACERDOTI PVBLICAE. LOCVS SEPVLTVR(ae) DATVS DECVRIONVM DECRETO.

To Mamia, daughter of Publius Mamius, City Priestess. Gravesite given by decree of the Town Council




CIL
X. 1024 + p. 967 = ILS 6366: (similarly, Année épigraphique 1913 #70 and 71)

A VMBRICIO A F MEN | SCAVRO | II VIR I D | HVIC DECVRIONES LOCVM MONVM | ET HS ì ì IN FVNERE ET
STATVAM EQVSTR | IN FORO PONENDAM CENSVERVNT. | SCAVRVS PATER FILIO.

To Aulus Umbricius Scaurus, son of Aulus, tribe Menenia, Duovir of the Colony. The Decuriones voted for a site, a monument, 2000 HS for the funeral, and an equestrian statue to be erected in the Forum. Scaurus the Father for his son.

[Note: The median cost for an Italian funeral was ca. 10,000 HS.]


ILS 5706: (at the Stabian Baths, mid I B.C.)

C VVLIVS C F P ANINIVS C F II V I D | LACONICVM ET DESTRICTARIVM | FACIVND ET PORTICVS ET PALAESTR REFICIVNDA LOCARVNT EX D D EX | EA PEQVNIA QVOD EOS E LEGE | IN LVDOS AVT IN MONVMENTO | CONSVMERE OPORTVIT, FACIVN | COERARVNT EIDEM PROBARV.

Gaius Julius (? or Vulius) son of Gaius and Pubilius Aninius son of Gaius, Duoviri, let the contracts for the Turkish Bath and the Robing Room and for the refurbishing of the Portico and the Palaestra, in accordance with a Decree of the Town Council, out of the money which the law requires them to spend for games or public works. The same officials oversaw the construction and inspection.


ILS 5053 (4):

A CLODIVS A F MEN FLACCVS II VIR I D TER, QVINQ, TRIB MIL A POPVLO. PRIMO DVOMVIRATV
APOLLINARIB IN FORO POMPAM, TAVROS, TAVROCENTAS, SVCCVRSORES, PONTARIOS PARIA III, PVGILES
CATERVARIOS ET PYCTAS, LVDOS OMNIBVS ACRVAMATIS PANTOMIMISQ OMNIBVS ET PYLADE ET HS n ((I)) IN
PVBLICVM PRO DVOMVIRATV. SECVNDO DVOMVIRATV QUINQ APOLLINARIBVS IN FORO POMPAM, TAVROS,
SVCCVRSORES, PVGILES CATERVARIOS; POSTERO DIE SOLVS IN SPECTACVLIS ATLETAS PAR XXX GLAD PAR V,
ET GLADIAT PAR XXXV ET VENATION TAVROS TAVROCENTAS APROS VRSOS CETERA VENATIONE VARIA CVM
COLLEGA. TERTIO DVOMVIRATV LVDOS FACTIONE PRIMA, ADIECTIS ACRVAMATIS CVM COLLEGA.

Aulus Clodius Flaccus, son of Aulus, Tribe Menenia, Duovir three times (once as Quinquennial), Military Tribune elected by the People. In his first term, at the Apollo Games (first half of July) in the Forum (he presented) a Procession, bullfights, bullbaiting, ..... boxers and games with all the usual appurtenances and pantomimes and Pylades, and (spent) 10,000 HS on the public for his duumvirate. In his second (Quinquennial) term, at the Apollo Games in the Forum he presented a procession, bullfights,....boxers ; on the next day he alone put on at the spectacles 30 pairs of athetes, 5 pairs of gladiators, and with his colleague he presented 25 pairs of gladiators and the animal hunts, bullfighting, bull-baiting, wild boars, bears and other animals in various hunts. In his third term along with his colleague he presented games with the appropriate accompaniments ? in the first round ? .







Another page of Pompeian Inscriptions! (1 of 2)
Return to the Greek and Roman History Links.